TJA Digital Workbook

36th Annual TJA Conference • May 2–6, 2022 • San Marcos, Texas

Agenda

Claim Your Credit! Please Don’t Forget!
Please be sure to fill out your attendance card in order to receive your credit. If your card is not submitted prior to the close of the conference you will not receive credit.
There will be no exceptions!

Monday, May 2

8:00am–5:00pm • Permanent Registration
Registration

9:00am–12:00pm • Spring Lake AB
Breakout Session I
Required Reporting and Construction

Lupe Moreno, Alicia Barker & Courtney Elrod

In this session, the student will learn how to prepare and submit all reports required by the Commission, by the 5th day of each month. They will also learn how to categorize inmates according to the severity of the charges and what category the inmate should be placed in. There are three categories: local, contract and housed elsewhere. The instructors will teach how to check the report for accuracy and help correct errors found. The student will learn what information is needed such as name, SID, etc. The student will learn how to check the report for accuracy and correct problems with the county. The student will learn what information is needed to correctly prepare the report. The student will learn how to correctly submit the report. The student will learn how to correctly submit Operational Plans. The student will learn how to properly address items listed in referenced sections. The student will learn how and when to submit the Serious Incident Report. The student will learn how and when to report a death or escape. The student will learn when a commissary audit is to be submitted. The student will learn when and how to report construction or upgrades to the facility.

Lupe Moreno
Program Specialist (Operational Plans), Texas Commission on Jail Standards

Lupe Moreno joined the Commission in November 2014, as a program specialist responsible for analyzing the monthly data regarding population, paper ready inmates, and the immigration/detainer reports. In April 2018, Lupe assumed the duties of reviewing and approving all Operational Plans submitted to the Commission by each County. Prior to working at the Commission, Lupe began her career as a corrections officer in 2003, at the Williamson County Jail in Georgetown, Texas. In her 11 years as a corrections officer in the Williamson County Jail, Lupe had many assignments to include working with the general population, in booking/release, and supervising inmate work crews.

Alicia Barker
Planner, Texas Commission on Jail Standards

Alicia Barker joined the Texas Commission on Jail Standards (TCJS) as an Assistant Planner in September 2018, after spending several years with the State Office of Risk Management and Health and Human Services Commission. Alicia was promoted to Planner in November 2019. Her primary duties are related to the planning of jail facilities to include construction plan review and comment, as well as to monitor and evaluate plans and programs to ensure compliance with administrative rules and regulation. Alicia also completed the Austin Police Departments Victim Services training, as a crisis team volunteer and has additional education regrading Crime Victims Compensation. An Austin native, Alicia graduated from Sam Houston State University with a Bachelor of Arts in Criminal Justice.

Courtney Elrod
Assistant Planner, Texas Commission on Jail Standards

Courtney Elrod joined the Texas Commission on Jail Standards (TCJS) in July 2021, as an Assistant Planner. Courtney’s primary duties are to assist in the planning of jail facilities to include construction plan review and comment as well as to monitor and evaluate plans and programs to ensure compliance with administrative rules and regulations. Prior to joining TCJS, Courtney completed her Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice with a minor in Homeland Security at Sam Houston State University.

9:00am–12:00pm • Spring Lake C
Breakout Session II
Courtroom Security

Jordon Heflin & Ricardo Sanchez

This course will help to identify the evolution of court security, technology, and screening. Participants will learn the duties of the bailiff. Discussion will include identifying explosives and their connection with court security functions. Additionally, this session will cover methods of enhancing judicial protection.

Jordon Heflin
Deputy, Travis County Sheriff’s Office

Jordan Heflin has worked for the Travis County Sheriff’s Office (TCSO) for five years. During her career, she has worked with maximum security inmates, lockdown male/female inmates, as well as general population units.

After working in the inmate units, Heflin transferred to the Hospital Visitation Unit. While in this division, she transported inmates to and from the hospital and coordinated setting up face to face and/or video visits for the inmates.

In 2017, Deputy Heflin obtained her Peace Officer’s License, which enabled her to apply for her current assignment, TCSO Courthouse Security. She is tasked with ensuring the safety and security for all Judges and Civilians in and out of the Courthouse, and the overall security of the building and its surrounding areas.

Ricardo Sanchez
Deputy, Travis County Sheriff’s Office

Ricardo Sanchez started his career with the Travis County Sheriff’s Office (TCSO) in March of 2009, at the Correctional Complex in Del Valle. There he was tasked with supervising maximum-security inmates. A year later, he promoted to the Field Training Officer position. Sanchez served in that position for four years and attended the Travis County Basic Peace Officer course in 2012. In February 2014, Sanchez took a position with the Courthouse Security team. After a year, he was assigned the Field Training Officer position with Courthouse Security. In 2016, he transitioned to the Deputy position at the Attorney General’s Child Support Courthouse, which is off campus from the downtown Courthouse Complex. His time at the Child Support Court has given him the opportunity to experience a myriad of hostile situations as they pertain to Court Security. Sanchez has served the public by de-escalating situations with parents and finding ways to comfort the young children that get thrown into the unfortunate mix.

9:00am–12:00pm • San Marcos River
Breakout Session III
Beyond the Basics: An In-depth Look at Highly Impactful Mental Health Issues in Jails

Ashleigh Walton

This course will do a deep dive on mental health diagnoses and issues, such as bipolar disorder and psychopathy, that often result in significant impacts to both incarcerated individuals and jail staff. Course materials will go beyond basic signs and symptoms covered in introductory mental health courses and examine topics such as diagnostic misconceptions that matter in jail settings, patterns of behavior, and medication challenges, as well as applicable skills for management of persons with these diagnoses and mental health issues.

Ashleigh Walton
Social Services Lead, Capital Area Private Defender Service

Ashleigh Walton (LPC, CCHP) has been working in the forensic mental health field for several years. She obtained her undergraduate degree at The University of Texas at Austin and completed her graduate work at John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York City. Ashleigh’s career has primarily focused on post-arrest individuals, both pre-adjudications, as well as post-adjudication. Ashleigh is currently employed as the Social Services Lead with Capital Area Private Defender Service and previously worked as the Clinical Mental Health Lead with Travis County Sheriff’s Office (TCSO). She has presented at conferences throughout the United States, as well as in Canada, and has published research pertaining to sexual offenders with psychopathic traits and the impact on the therapeutic alliance. Ashleigh is certified as a Jail Mental Health Officer (JMHO) Master Trainer and has conducted several rounds of this impactful training at the TCSO Training Academy, and additionally serves on the JMHO Steering Committee.

9:00am–12:00pm • Chautaqua Room
Breakout Session IV
Avoiding Harassment and Sexual Misconduct in a Jail Setting

Carmen Napp & Cheraun Blankenship

In this session, we will define discrimination and harassment and look at different ways that they present themselves in the workplace. We will also discuss the importance of county policies, employee protections and employee responsibilities related to these types of behaviors. As supervisors, you also have responsibilities when it comes to harassment, and we will review an update from the last legislative session that could have an impact on how you handle some of these situations.

Carmen Napp
Law Enforcement Consultant, Texas Association of Counties (TAC)

Carmen Napp joined TAC in 2018, as a Driving Simulator Consultant. She assumed a Law Enforcement Consultant position in late 2019, and is currently assigned to the Northwest Region. Prior to joining TAC, Napp served as the Chief Deputy of Moore County Sheriff’s Office for 18 years. She is the current President of the Texas Chief Deputies Association, and her prior experiences include having served on the Panhandle Regional Planning Commission/Amarillo College Training/Panhandle Regional Police Academy Board, Moore County Crime Stopper Coordinator, and Texas Panhandle Peace Officer Association Secretary. She holds a Master Peace Officers License and TCOLE Instructor Certification. Napp can be reached at carmenn@county.org or (512) 964-6572.

Cheraun Blankenship
Human Resource Consultant, Texas Association of Counties (TAC)

Cheraun Blankenship, PHR joined TAC in 2020 as a Human Resources Consultant for the Southwest region. Previously, she served for over 10 years at Guadalupe County as its Human Resources Director and Employee Benefits Administrator. While there she was instrumental in establishing needed policies, procedures and workflows. She is certified by the HR Certification Institute as a PHR-Professional in Human Resources.

Crown Correctional

10:00am • Landa Park Golf Course
Golf Tournament

12:00–1:00pm
Lunch (On Your Own)

1:00–5:00pm • Spring Lake AB
Breakout Session II
Legislative Update - 3187

Jack Choate

This course is a general summary of the additions and changes to the Texas Penal Code, Texas Code of Criminal Procedure, Texas Transportation Code and other statutes by the 87th Texas Legislature. Furthermore, this course will discuss the holdings of a few significant court decisions in both federal and state law.

Jack Choate
Executive Director, Special Prosecution Unit

Jack K. Choate currently serves as the Executive Director of the Special Prosecution Unit (SPU), a statewide prosecutor office. The Special Prosecution Unit is composed of three divisions: a criminal division, which prosecutes criminal cases arising from within the Texas Department of Criminal Justice; a juvenile division which prosecutes criminal cases arising from within the Texas Juvenile Justice Department; and a civil division which seeks to civilly commitment sexually violent predators who are being discharged from a correctional institution. Prior to joining the SPU, Choate was the Director of Training for the Texas District and County Attorneys Association. He spent most of his career serving as the First Assistant Criminal District Attorney for Walker County, Texas. Choate had been with the Walker County Criminal District Attorney’s Office since 1997 and prosecuted all types of criminal offenses, including juvenile, misdemeanor, and felony offenses. Choate has lectured frequently to prosecutors and other law enforcement groups on a variety of criminal justice topics.

1:00–5:00pm • Spring Lake C
Breakout Session II
What to Expect During an Inspection/Sunset Updates

Martin Arnold, Michael Gravitt, Jason Jouett, Byron Shelton & Brandon Wood

Participants will learn what will occur during an annual inspection and what inspectors review during an inspection. The students will learn the process of an inspection and review the ‘checklist’ - which is intended as a guide to assist in the inspection process. Areas of concern currently trending throughout the state will also be discussed. Attendees will have an opportunity to ask questions during the Q&A portion of the training.

Martin Arnold
Field Inspector, Texas Commission on Jail Standards

Martin Arnold joined the Texas Commission on Jail Standards as a Compliance Monitor on November 16, 2021. Martin began his 27-year career in corrections/law enforcement as a jailer with the Nueces County Sheriff’s Office in 1994. He promoted through the ranks until his retirement as Assistant Chief – Jail Operations (Jail Administrator) in 2021. Martin has attained his TCOLE Master Jailer and Master Peace Officer licenses as well as being a certified instructor.

Michael Gravitt
Northeast Texas Inspector, Texas Commission on Jail Standards

Michael Gravitt began his career with the Tarrant Sheriff’s Office in 1995, as a Tech Officer I. He achieved the ranks of Detention Officer, Corporal, Sergeant, and Lieutenant, mostly working in the booking department and also overseeing various other aspects of the jail operations. Gravitt advanced to the rank of Captain in 2008, where he oversaw the Support Services Division, which included procurement, laundry, kitchen operations, bonding, and facilities management liaison. As a Captain, he oversaw the jails inspection readiness and formed the compliance team in 2016. Gravitt retired from Tarrant County after 25 years’ service in August of 2020 and joined the Texas Commission on Jail Standards in September 2020, as an inspector.

Jason Jouett
North Texas Inspector, Texas Commission on Jail Standards

Jason Jouett began his career as a correctional officer with the Texas Department of Criminal Justice at the Price Daniel Unit in 1992, until he joined the U.S. Navy in 1994. He spent eight years in the Navy, serving onboard Nuclear Ballistic Missile Submarines. Jouett discharged from the Navy and came back to Texas in 2002. He was hired and promoted to the rank of lieutenant at the Rolling Plains Regional Jail prior to going to work as a corrections/training officer at the Eden Detention Center in Eden, Texas (CCA). He left CCA in 2014, and accepted the position of Jail Administrator with the Runnels County Jail in Ballinger, Texas, where he served until joining the Commission on August 1, 2018. Jason holds a Jailers License, TCOLE Instructors License, TCOLE Firearms Instructors License, Chemical Agents and Less Lethal Munitions Instructors License, as well as, a PPCT Instructors License.

Byron Shelton
East Texas Inspector, Texas Commission on Jail Standards

Byron Shelton began his career as a jailer with the Temple Police Department in Temple, Texas in 1998, and in 2001, joined the Bell County Sheriff’s Office as a jailer. He recently finished his career retiring after 19 years of service with this department as a Lieutenant. Shelton was responsible for special projects as well as being the lead instructor for their jail academy. While at Bell County, he climbed the ranks and was promoted up the ladder from Corporal, to Sergeant, to Lieutenant. Eventually, he was promoted to the rank of Captain, Jail Administrator. He held this position for approximately two and a half years. Additionally, while with the agency Shelton was a vital part in the agency passing the yearly jail inspection for 19 consecutive years, his entire tenure with the agency. Shelton holds a Master Jailer Proficiency, as well as Master Peace Officer Proficiency. He has served as a Director and the Parliamentarian for the Texas Jail Association. Additionally, he was a proud member of the Large Jail Network sponsored by the National Institute of Corrections. Lastly, Shelton is a licensed TCOLE instructor and thoroughly enjoys teaching classes and conducting training.

Brandon Wood
Executive Director, Texas Commission on Jail Standards

Brandon Wood currently serves as the Executive Director of the Texas Commission on Jail Standards. He joined the Commission in May 1999, when he was hired as Planning Assistant. Wood is a graduate of Texas A&M University.

1:00–5:00pm • San Marcos River
Breakout Session III
Officer Wellness

Abby Belangeri & Becky Caffey

Jail officers work in a challenging environment that taxes their resources. This course is designed to educate jail officers on the impact their job can have on their mental, physical, emotional and spiritual/social health. We will discuss protective actions that can be enacted by officers to support improved health. We will also discuss the importance of resilience and building upon resiliency factors to improve the lives of jail officers.

Abby Belangeri
Support Services Lieutenant/PREA Coordinator, Brazos County Sheriff’s Office

Abby Belangeri has worked for the Brazos County Sheriff’s Office for 13 years and is currently a Lieutenant over the Support Services/PREA Coordinator Division. She also has experience in jail floor operations and intake/release. Abby is a graduate of the National Jail Leadership Command Academy, Class #28 and served as Class President. She completed the Jail Mental Health Officer (JMHO) training and JMHO Master Trainer course and is assisting with facilitating continued mental health jail officer training. Abby implemented a Jail CIT team at the Brazos County Detention Center. She possesses a Master Jailer License.

Abby holds a bachelor’s degree in Psychology from Central Michigan University. She is currently pursuing her Master of Science in the Criminal Justice Leadership and Management program at Sam Houston State University. Abby currently serves as a Treasurer on the TJA Board and has assisted with instruction of the TJA Regional Trainings hosted around the state.

Becky Caffey
Chief of Corrections, Brown County Sheriff’s Office

Becky Caffey began her career in 1988, and currently holds a dual certification as Master Jailer and Master Peace Officer. In 2016, she became a Certified Jail Manager with the Ameri¬can Jail Association. Also in 2016, Becky was appointed as a Director on the Texas Jail Association (TJA) Board. In 2017, she was elected as a director to serve a three-year term. In 2018, Becky graduated from the Jail Mental Health Officer (JMHO) training and JMHO Master Trainer course.

Becky Caffey is currently Chief Deputy of Corrections for the Brown County Sheriff’s Office and has approximately 27 years of experience in corrections. Becky enjoys her time on the TJA Board of Directors and is always willing to serve in any capacity requested.

1:00–5:00pm • Chautaqua
Breakout Session IV
Interactive Rescue Techniques for Suicide Prevention

David Whitis, Kenny Lemons & Don Courtney

This course will focus on the seriousness of inmate suicide in jails nationally and in Texas. Liability concerns and accompanying risk facts about inmate suicide will be examined. Common myths about inmate suicides will be explained and preventative practices will be provided. Participants will learn to recognize methods for early risk detection, as well as identify potential hazards associated with inmate behavior. Participants will demonstrate proper responses to potential suicidal threats by inmates and will use manikins and cutdown tools to simulate rescuing a suicidal inmate from hanging.

David Whitis
Law Enforcement Consultant, Texas Association of Counties (TAC)

David Whitis joined Texas Association of Counties in June 2016, as a law enforcement consultant. Prior to joining TAC, he was the Lampasas County Sheriff, elected in 2008, and re-elected to a second term in 2012. Prior to becoming Lampasas County Sheriff, he served Lampasas County as Chief Deputy and as a Sergeant/Criminal Investigator from 1992-2008. Whitis began his career in law enforcement with the City of Lampasas in 1988. He is a certified Instructor and holds a Mas¬ter Peace Officer License. Whitis can be reached at davidw@county.org or (512) 517-2547.

Kenny Lemons
Law Enforcement Consultant, Texas Association of Counties (TAC)

Retired Sheriff Kenny Lemons joined TAC in 2019, as a Law Enforcement Consultant and is assigned to the Northeast Region. Prior to joining TAC, he served three terms as Sheriff of Clay County. Lemons has over 30 years of total law enforcement experience, including 20 years with the Clay County Sheriff’s Office and seven years with the Wichita County Sheriff’s Office. He holds a Master Peace Officer License and an Advanced TCOLE Instructor Certificate. Lemons is also a CQB Instructor and is certified in Fire/Arson Investigation and advanced SWAT. He graduated Magna Cum Laude with a B.A.A.S. from Midwestern State University and attained a master’s degree in criminal justice from Midwestern State in 2018. Lemons is also a graduate of the LEMIT Leadership Command College. He can be reached at kennyl@county.org or (940) 636-8378.

Don Courtney
Driving Simulator Consultant, Texas Association of Counties (TAC)

Don Courtney joined the Texas Association of Counties in September 2005. He works in the Risk Management Services Division as the TAC Driving Simulator Consultant. Prior to arriving at TAC Don served as the Jail Administrator for the Eastland County Jail for over nine years. As Jail Administrator of a 97 bed facility, he supervised a staff of 17 employees. He holds a Master Jailers Certificate, a TCOLE Instructor’s Certification, in addition to an ALERT International Driving Instructor’s Certificate, Don has a Texas A&M (TEEX) EVOC Driving Instructor Certificate. Don also held a seat on the Texas Jail Association (TJA) Board of Directors from the years 2004 through 2006. Prior to his distinguished career in Texas law enforcement Don served 20 years in the Armed Forces and was a Peace Officer for the State of Arizona. Mr. Courtney, the TAC Driving Simulator Consultant, assists in coordinating and instructing other TAC and TCOLE law enforcement training.

Keefe Group Ad

5:00–6:00pm • Rocky River Grille
1st Time Attendee Meet & Greet

6:00pm • Hotel Parking Lot
Welcome BBQ & Scholarship Fundraiser
**$5.00 per person**

ATIMS Ad

Tuesday, May 3

7:00am–12:00pm • Permanent Registration
Registration

7:00–11:30am
Exhibit Set-Up (Exhibitors Only)

8:30–9:15am • Spring Lake Ballroom
Opening Ceremony
Presentation of the Colors & National Anthem
McLennan County Sheriff's Office Honor Guard
Marco Hinojos

Welcoming Remarks
Ricky Armstrong, TJA President
Sharese Hurst, TJA Executive Director
Gary Cutler, Sheriff of Hays County
Brandon Wood, TCJS Executive Director

9:15–9:30am • Spring Lake Ballroom
Election Information & Introduction of Candidates

9:30–9:45am • Spring Lake Ballroom
Legislative Update
Kelly Rowe

9:45–10:00am
Break

10:00–11:30am • Spring Lake Ballroom
KEYNOTE ADDRESS
Doug Dretke

Doug Dretke
Executive Director, Correctional Management Institute of Texas

Doug Dretke currently serves as executive director for the Correctional Management Institute of Texas (CMIT) located within the George J. Beto Criminal Justice Center at Sam Houston State University (SHSU). CMIT serves training and professional development needs of criminal justice and correctional professionals across the broad spectrum of the criminal justice system. Dretke also serves as an Adjunct Faculty member teaching Correctional Systems and Practices within the College of Criminal Justice at SHSU. He is an elected member of the Board of Governors for the American Corrections Association.

Dretke is a 26-year veteran of the Texas Department of Criminal Justice (TDCJ). He began his career as a correctional officer for the TDCJ, served as Warden for two different units before becoming Director of the Correctional Institutions (prison) Division of TDCJ. He retired from TDCJ in July 2006 to become director of CMIT. He wanted to build strong working relationships with state and national leaders to him insight on issues and challenges facing corrections leaders today. Dretke earned his bachelor’s degree in criminology and corrections from Sam Houston State University, and his Master of Public Administration with a criminal justice concentration from Texas A&M Corpus Christi. He has become a highly regarded presenter/facilitator and is active nationwide and internationally on various criminal justice-related issues.

NCIC Ad

11:30am–4:30pm • Hotel Parking Lot
Blood Drive

11:30am–5:00pm
Exhibitor Showroom Open

11:30am–1:30pm
President's Lunch

1:30–3:00pm • Spring Lake A
Breakout Session I
What You Need To Know About Psychotropic Medication in Jails

Deborah Sant'Anna

The instructor will discuss psychiatric illnesses, medication, commonly abused medications, and how to identify life threatening side effects. This session is an informal lecture and discussion.

Deborah Sant'Anna
Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner, CorrHealth

Deborah Sant'Anna is a Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner, originally from Brazil, who treats mental health patients in jail settings. She currently works for CorrHealth, who serves several counties in Texas, Colorado, and New Mexico. Deb Sant'Anna works for Mclennan County and Midland County. Deb has been working in psychiatry since 2007, and is Board Certified.

1:30–3:00pm • Spring Lake B
Breakout Session II
Destination Retirement

Richard Ashcraft

This course is a general overview of TCDRS, including rules for retirement eligibility, processes, and benefits specific to TCDRS membership. The participant will gain a better understanding of the seven retirement payment options to be selected from at retirement. Also, the class will discuss topics external to TCDRS to research and evaluate prior to retirement for overall retirement readiness.

Richard Ashcraft
Member Services Field Representative, Texas County and District Retirement System

Since 2009, Richard Ashcraft has traveled the state providing Texas County and District Retirement System (TCDRS) education to members through group presentations and one-on-one personal benefit counseling. Prior to TCDRS, he championed various customer service roles, including management positions for several bookstores. Performing as a professional organist since 2008, Richard has a degree in general studies with an emphasis in music from Howard Payne University.

1:30–3:00pm • Spring Lake C
Breakout Session III
How to Build a Compliance Team

Shane Sowell & Lynette Anderson

This session will cover the basic concept on what is needed to form a compliance team. We will cover obstacles in getting started and issues that come up along the way. The instructors will discuss the importance of getting support from administration and the freedom required to accomplish what is being asked. The course will also cover how the system will add another means of training to all staff involved in the day-to-day operations. Building a compliance team will make future inspections less stressful and much more successful.

Shane Sowell
Jail Administrator, Bell County Sheriff’s Office

Shane Sowell is the Jail Administrator for the Bell County Sheriff’s Office. Shane started his law enforcement career in 1996 as a jailer. Through Shane’s career he has worked in many areas to include the jail, patrol, narcotics, K-9, interdiction and has held various supervisory positions. Shane worked for the Texas Commission on Jail Standards as an Inspector for approximately five years. Shane was fortunate enough to be directly involved in the development of the Jail Mental Health Officer Certification Course and was the first instructor from the State of Texas to teach Texas Jailers the initiative. Shane is the current Sergeant-at-Arms on the Texas Jail Association Board of Directors and has been a member for 17 years.

Lynette Anderson
Detention Lieutenant, Harris County Sheriff’s Office

Lynette Anderson has been employed with the Harris County Sheriff’s Office since September 16, 1991. In May 2009, the Harris County Sheriff’s Office developed a career ladder for detention officers, and she promoted to Detention Sergeant, May 8, 2009. Anderson worked in housing the first year as a Detention Sergeant. In July of 2010, she was offered the position of Operations Sergeant at the 1200 Baker Street Jail. This position was formerly held by certified supervisors only. She spent three and half years in that position until January 25, 2014, when she was promoted to Detention Lieutenant.

Once promoted, Lieutenant Anderson was assigned as the Day Watch Commander at the 1200 Baker Street Jail. She supervised approximately 164 detention officers and supervisors. She was also the Commander for the Detention Command Containment Team.

In July of 2015, Anderson was transferred to the Inmate Services Division of the Harris County Sheriff’s Office. This assignment consists of kitchen, laundry, commissary, law library, mail room, commissary, education, and recreation.

Lieutenant Anderson is a graduate of the 12th National Jail Leadership Command Academy (NJLCA) class and was voted Class President. She mentored classes 14, 17, 29, and 40 for the NJLCA. Anderson also serves on the Women in Criminal Justice Advisory Council for the Correctional Management Institute of Texas (CMIT). She assists in planning and hosting the Women in Criminal Justice Conference for CMIT. Detention Lieutenant Anderson is active with the Texas Jail Association (TJA) and has served on the Board in several capacities; 2020-2021 as the Chaplain and Secretary 2020-Present.

1:30–3:00pm • San Marcos River A
Breakout Session IV
Don't Be That Guy 2.0: Social Media, Public Employees, and the Law

Ray Scifres

An officer is on a social media video being “that guy.” It goes viral and your agency news feed is blown up with negative feedback. Public safety employees, like the general population, use social media on a daily basis, and we see videos, memes, and comments that leave us asking ourselves, “Can they do that?”

Speech by employees is a confusing area to navigate, and it is especially so when dealing with public employees and employers. With the growth of social media and its use by our employees, we continually deal with the question of, “What is acceptable?” This interactive session breaks down the rules, rights, and responsibilities when dealing with speech by public employees through the use of relevant examples and gives practical tips for administrators and employees.

Ray Scifres
Sheriff, Hockley County Sheriff’s Office

Ray Scifres is currently serving his second term as Sheriff in Hockley County, Texas. He earned a Bachelor of Applied Arts and Sciences and a Master of Science in Criminal Justice from Lamar University in Beaumont, Texas, and is currently a doctoral student at Wayland Baptist University in Plainview, Texas. He serves as an adjunct instructor at South Plains College in Levelland, Texas, teaching academic and cadet academy courses involving correctional systems.

Ray and his wife Ashley are raising three daughters and reside in Levelland, Texas. He serves on several local and statewide committees and boards including StarCare Specialty Health System board as an ex-officio member and the Salvation Army of Hockley County board. Ray is active in the Sheriffs’ Association of Texas and the Texas Jail Association. He currently serves as the Sheriffs Representative on the TJA Board and the County Corrections Advisory Council for the Correctional Management Institute of Texas.

1:30–3:00pm • San Marcos River B
Breakout Session V
Effective Communication Strategies with Deaf Offenders Using Sign Language

Paul Singleton

The attendee will learn how to effectively communicate with deaf offenders who use American Sign Language (ASL). The instructor will discuss the minimum jail standards recommending video relay services.

Paul Singleton
Director of Correctional Solutions, Purple Communications

Paul Singleton is the Director of Correctional Solutions with Purple Communications. He previously worked with the Office of Secretary of Defense at the Pentagon for 17 years, managing the Computer/Electronic Accommodations Program. Singleton is a graduate of Gallaudet University in Washington, D.C., with a master’s degree in administration. He spearheaded the Deaf President Now (DPN) movement at Gallaudet.

Singleton is one of the original architects of the Americans with Disabilities Act. ADA Title II and IV are his subject matter expertise, applying solutions to employment and telecommunication challenges. With Purple Communications, he is able to provide Video Relay Services solutions and sign language consultations to over 1,000 prison facilities in the USA, including Texas Department of Criminal Justice (TDCJ) facilities.

1:30–3:00pm • Chautaqua Room
Breakout Session VI
Recruiting and Retention - Roundtable Discussion

Rowdee Edwards & Johnny Jaquess

Panel discussion on current recruiting and retention efforts in Texas Jails.

Rowdee Edwards
Lieutenant, Collin County Sheriff’s Office

Rowdee Edwards is the Lieutenant for Compliance and Training at the Collin County Sheriff’s Office. He has been a Corrections Professional for the past 12 years working for TDCJ, Hale County Sheriff’s Office and Hockley County Sheriff’s Office. He served Hockley County for the past 7 years and during his time there he helped implement a successful FTO program for small counties and aided with the implementation of professional standards. He holds an Intermediate Jailer License, is a TCOLE Instructor and a Less than Lethal Instructor. He is a graduate of the National Jail Leadership Academy. He currently serves as a Director for the Texas Jail Association.

Johnny Jaquess
Assistant Chief, Collin County Sheriff’s Office

Assistant Chief Johnny Jaquess is the Jail Administrator for the Collin County Sheriff’s Office in McKinney, Texas. He started his career as a detention officer 25 years ago, with the Lubbock County Sheriff's Office, where he worked his way up through the ranks and retired as Captain overseeing the day-to-day operations of their Detention Center. He holds both Master Jailer and Master Peace Officer licenses and is a TCOLE certified instructor, firearms instructor, and Mental Health Peace Officer. He earned a bachelor’s degree from Wayland Baptist University in human services with a specialization in criminal justice. He is a graduate of the National Jail Leadership Academy, Jail Executive Development Program, and is a Certified Jail Manager through the American Jail Association. Currently, he serves as the 3rd Vice President for the Texas Jail Association. Additionally, he is proud to have served as a Commissioned Officer in the Army.

Securus Ad

3:00–3:30pm
Break

3:30–5:00pm • Spring Lake A
Breakout Session I
What You Need To Know About Psychotropic Medication in Jails

Deborah Sant'Anna

The instructor will discuss psychiatric illnesses, medication, commonly abused medications, and how to identify life threatening side effects. This session is an informal lecture and discussion.

Deborah Sant'Anna
Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner, CorrHealth

Deborah Sant'Anna is a Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner, originally from Brazil, who treats mental health patients in jail settings. She currently works for CorrHealth, who serves several counties in Texas, Colorado, and New Mexico. Deb Sant'Anna works for Mclennan County and Midland County. Deb has been working in psychiatry since 2007, and is Board Certified.

3:30–5:00pm • Spring Lake B
Breakout Session II
Destination Retirement

Richard Ashcraft

This course is a general overview of TCDRS, including rules for retirement eligibility, processes, and benefits specific to TCDRS membership. The participant will gain a better understanding of the seven retirement payment options to be selected from at retirement. Also, the class will discuss topics external to TCDRS to research and evaluate prior to retirement for overall retirement readiness.

Richard Ashcraft
Member Services Field Representative, Texas County and District Retirement System

Since 2009, Richard Ashcraft has traveled the state providing Texas County and District Retirement System (TCDRS) education to members through group presentations and one-on-one personal benefit counseling. Prior to TCDRS, he championed various customer service roles, including management positions for several bookstores. Performing as a professional organist since 2008, Richard has a degree in general studies with an emphasis in music from Howard Payne University.

3:30–5:00pm • Spring Lake C
Breakout Session III
How to Build a Compliance Team

Shane Sowell & Lynette Anderson

This session will cover the basic concept on what is needed to form a compliance team. We will cover obstacles in getting started and issues that come up along the way. The instructors will discuss the importance of getting support from administration and the freedom required to accomplish what is being asked. The course will also cover how the system will add another means of training to all staff involved in the day-to-day operations. Building a compliance team will make future inspections less stressful and much more successful.

Shane Sowell
Jail Administrator, Bell County Sheriff’s Office

Shane Sowell is the Jail Administrator for the Bell County Sheriff’s Office. Shane started his law enforcement career in 1996 as a jailer. Through Shane’s career he has worked in many areas to include the jail, patrol, narcotics, K-9, interdiction and has held various supervisory positions. Shane worked for the Texas Commission on Jail Standards as an Inspector for approximately five years. Shane was fortunate enough to be directly involved in the development of the Jail Mental Health Officer Certification Course and was the first instructor from the State of Texas to teach Texas Jailers the initiative. Shane is the current Sergeant-at-Arms on the Texas Jail Association Board of Directors and has been a member for 17 years.

Lynette Anderson
Detention Lieutenant, Harris County Sheriff’s Office

Lynette Anderson has been employed with the Harris County Sheriff’s Office since September 16, 1991. In May 2009, the Harris County Sheriff’s Office developed a career ladder for detention officers, and she promoted to Detention Sergeant, May 8, 2009. Anderson worked in housing the first year as a Detention Sergeant. In July of 2010, she was offered the position of Operations Sergeant at the 1200 Baker Street Jail. This position was formerly held by certified supervisors only. She spent three and half years in that position until January 25, 2014, when she was promoted to Detention Lieutenant.

Once promoted, Lieutenant Anderson was assigned as the Day Watch Commander at the 1200 Baker Street Jail. She supervised approximately 164 detention officers and supervisors. She was also the Commander for the Detention Command Containment Team.

In July of 2015, Anderson was transferred to the Inmate Services Division of the Harris County Sheriff’s Office. This assignment consists of kitchen, laundry, commissary, law library, mail room, commissary, education, and recreation.

Lieutenant Anderson is a graduate of the 12th National Jail Leadership Command Academy (NJLCA) class and was voted Class President. She mentored classes 14, 17, 29, and 40 for the NJLCA. Anderson also serves on the Women in Criminal Justice Advisory Council for the Correctional Management Institute of Texas (CMIT). She assists in planning and hosting the Women in Criminal Justice Conference for CMIT. Detention Lieutenant Anderson is active with the Texas Jail Association (TJA) and has served on the Board in several capacities; 2020-2021 as the Chaplain and Secretary 2020-Present.

3:30–5:00pm • San Marcos River A
Breakout Session IV
Don't Be That Guy 2.0: Social Media, Public Employees, and the Law

Ray Scifres

An officer is on a social media video being “that guy.” It goes viral and your agency news feed is blown up with negative feedback. Public safety employees, like the general population, use social media on a daily basis, and we see videos, memes, and comments that leave us asking ourselves, “Can they do that?”

Speech by employees is a confusing area to navigate, and it is especially so when dealing with public employees and employers. With the growth of social media and its use by our employees, we continually deal with the question of, “What is acceptable?” This interactive session breaks down the rules, rights, and responsibilities when dealing with speech by public employees through the use of relevant examples and gives practical tips for administrators and employees.

Ray Scifres
Sheriff, Hockley County Sheriff’s Office

Ray Scifres is currently serving his second term as Sheriff in Hockley County, Texas. He earned a Bachelor of Applied Arts and Sciences and a Master of Science in Criminal Justice from Lamar University in Beaumont, Texas, and is currently a doctoral student at Wayland Baptist University in Plainview, Texas. He serves as an adjunct instructor at South Plains College in Levelland, Texas, teaching academic and cadet academy courses involving correctional systems.

Ray and his wife Ashley are raising three daughters and reside in Levelland, Texas. He serves on several local and statewide committees and boards including StarCare Specialty Health System board as an ex-officio member and the Salvation Army of Hockley County board. Ray is active in the Sheriffs’ Association of Texas and the Texas Jail Association. He currently serves as the Sheriffs Representative on the TJA Board and the County Corrections Advisory Council for the Correctional Management Institute of Texas.

3:30–5:00pm • San Marcos River B
Breakout Session V
Effective Communication Strategies with Deaf Offenders Using Sign Language

Paul Singleton

The attendee will learn how to effectively communicate with deaf offenders who use American Sign Language (ASL). The instructor will discuss the minimum jail standards recommending video relay services.

Paul Singleton
Director of Correctional Solutions, Purple Communications

Paul Singleton is the Director of Correctional Solutions with Purple Communications. He previously worked with the Office of Secretary of Defense at the Pentagon for 17 years, managing the Computer/Electronic Accommodations Program. Singleton is a graduate of Gallaudet University in Washington, D.C., with a master’s degree in administration. He spearheaded the Deaf President Now (DPN) movement at Gallaudet.

Singleton is one of the original architects of the Americans with Disabilities Act. ADA Title II and IV are his subject matter expertise, applying solutions to employment and telecommunication challenges. With Purple Communications, he is able to provide Video Relay Services solutions and sign language consultations to over 1,000 prison facilities in the USA, including Texas Department of Criminal Justice (TDCJ) facilities.

3:30–5:00pm • Chautaqua Room
Breakout Session VI
Recruiting and Retention - Roundtable Discussion

Rowdee Edwards & Johnny Jaquess

Panel discussion on current recruiting and retention efforts in Texas Jails.

Rowdee Edwards
Lieutenant, Collin County Sheriff’s Office

Rowdee Edwards is the Lieutenant for Compliance and Training at the Collin County Sheriff’s Office. He has been a Corrections Professional for the past 12 years working for TDCJ, Hale County Sheriff’s Office and Hockley County Sheriff’s Office. He served Hockley County for the past 7 years and during his time there he helped implement a successful FTO program for small counties and aided with the implementation of professional standards. He holds an Intermediate Jailer License, is a TCOLE Instructor and a Less than Lethal Instructor. He is a graduate of the National Jail Leadership Academy. He currently serves as a Director for the Texas Jail Association.

Johnny Jaquess
Assistant Chief, Collin County Sheriff’s Office

Assistant Chief Johnny Jaquess is the Jail Administrator for the Collin County Sheriff’s Office in McKinney, Texas. He started his career as a detention officer 25 years ago, with the Lubbock County Sheriff's Office, where he worked his way up through the ranks and retired as Captain overseeing the day-to-day operations of their Detention Center. He holds both Master Jailer and Master Peace Officer licenses and is a TCOLE certified instructor, firearms instructor, and Mental Health Peace Officer. He earned a bachelor’s degree from Wayland Baptist University in human services with a specialization in criminal justice. He is a graduate of the National Jail Leadership Academy, Jail Executive Development Program, and is a Certified Jail Manager through the American Jail Association. Currently, he serves as the 3rd Vice President for the Texas Jail Association. Additionally, he is proud to have served as a Commissioned Officer in the Army.

Viapath Ad

7:00–11:00pm • Hotel Foyer
Cornhole Night

Bob Barker Company Ad

Wednesday, May 4

7:30am • Hotel Atrium
Board Photo

7:45am • Hotel Atrium
Past President's Photo

8:00–9:00am • Veramendi
Join the Exhibitors for Breakfast

8:00–11:00am • Veramendi
Exhibitor Showroom Open

9:00am–4:30pm • Hotel Atrium
Courtroom Challenge: Quick Draw
Texas Commission on Jail Standards

9:00am–12:00pm • Spring Lake A
Breakout Session I
Texas Gangs

Devin Gonzales

This course focuses on entering the most vital information when creating a new record entry into the TXGANG database and learning how to navigate the TXGANG database. We will also review how to search a suspect and for a suspect within the database. TXGANG is a multi-jurisdictional database. TXGANG data is a repository to maintain gang information. The purpose of TXGANG is to collect, analyze, store, and share data with other law enforcement agencies to help save the lives of those in the field. TXGANG is a proactive solution for law enforcement officials where officers can keep intelligence current by identifying suspected gang members and entering the correct information into the system. It also serves the criminal justice system by assisting corrections officers with supervising gang members, improving investigations, and increasing prosecutions of gang members. It is a critical tool for networking information. Without sharing intelligence, this information would typically take weeks or months to retrieve the suspected gang or gang member’s criminal activity.

Devin Gonzales
Captain, Texas Department of Public Safety

Devin R. Gonzales has been employed with the Texas Department of Public Safety since 1999. Gonzales was assigned to the Texas Highway Patrol from March 2000 to October 2005. In October of 2005, Gonzales promoted to Sergeant in the Criminal Law Enforcement Division and assigned to the Narcotics Service in Laredo, Webb County, TX. In October of 2007, Gonzales transferred to the Criminal Law Enforcement Narcotics Service North Texas Region Garland Office. In 2010 Gonzales transferred to the newly established Texas Department of Public Safety Criminal Investigations Division (CID) as an Agent in the Garland Office Major Gang Squad. In February 2013, Gonzales was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant and was placed in a supervisory role over the North Texas Region (Garland) Criminal Investigations Division Drug Trafficking Organizations group. In February 2014, Gonzales was transferred to supervisor the Texas Department of Public Safety CID North Texas Region Major Gang Unit (Garland) as the Lieutenant. In December of 2016 Gonzales was promoted to the position of Captain over Criminal Investigations Division, North Texas Region, District D. Here, Captain Gonzales supervised three (3) CID Units which consists of (1) Drug Trafficking Group, one (1) Human Trafficking Group and the Task Force group. In September of 2019, Captain Gonzales was transferred to the Texas Anti-Gang Center and now supervisors the Garland and Hurst Major Gang Units (1E District) as the Captain. In addition Captain Gonzales has a Narcotics Unit in Garland and Denton. Gonzales holds a Master Peace Officer’s license through the Texas Commission On Law Enforcement. Gonzales has a history of investigating narcotics trafficking groups and gangs in the State of Texas. In the past several years, Captain Gonzales has served as an instructor and lecturer on gang history, identification, and confirmation through the TXGang database, presenting to different law enforcement agencies across the state, DFW metroplex, and Oklahoma. In addition, Captain Gonzales instructs new CID Agents on gang recognition, TXGang and criminal enterprise investigations. Captain Gonzales continues to interact routinely with prosecuting attorneys regarding gang intelligence and their request for assistance in gang-related cases.

Captain Gonzales continues to increase and enhance his knowledge of the evolution of criminal street and prison gangs by continuing to investigate gang cases alongside Major Gang Unit Special Agents; reviewing testimony, investigative reports, and documents of law enforcement agencies in gang-related cases throughout Texas; personally debriefing criminal gang defendants; attending contemporary gang training conferences and seminars.

9:00am–12:00pm • Spring Lake B
Breakout Session II
Successful Courtroom Testimony

Jo Ann Linzer

The last thing a member of law enforcement wants to do is to testify in a courtroom, to feel like his or her work is being reviewed with a red pen, to justify his or her actions in a courtroom. However, courtroom testimony may be a consequence of the job whether you are a peace officer, probation officer, parole officer, corrections officer or support staff.

This course will assist participants in discovering keys to good report writing which may keep them out of a courtroom. It will also provide officers with information and tips for when it comes time to testify. Through the presentation and activities, participants will take away useful information for the next time they hit the witness stand. Knowing how to prepare, the trial process and the role that being a witness plays in a trial and hearing gives every witness a sense of confidence that will put them more at ease.

The course consists of a PowerPoint and discussion lasting one hour and has two activities. Topics covered include the trial process, pretrial hearings, courtroom demeanor, attorney/witness meetings, credibility, legal issues, direct and cross examination, and jury perception. The activities give the participants an opportunity to network and to role play as if they were in a courtroom setting.

Jo Ann Linzer
Attorney, Linzer and Gaines Attorneys at Law

Jo Ann Linzer has been teaching law enforcement, lawyers, and others who work with courts and law enforcement for over 15 years. She was awarded the Texas District and County Attorney’s Association (TDCAA) C. Chris Marshall Award in 2017, for “outstanding contributions in the education of Texas Prosecutors.” Jo Ann has been named one of the 10 Best Attorneys in Texas and is Board Certified in Criminal Law.

After college, Jo Ann had a career in the theme park industry. Her expertise was in training and development. In the corporate world, she taught front-line employees, leaders, and managers how to be more effective in their roles. She brought that love of training with her when she became a prosecutor and taught with TDCAA at law enforcement agencies and in district attorneys’ offices across the state. She is currently a guest lecturer at Baylor School of Law. She was a prosecutor for approximately 15 years in and now owns a criminal defense practice. She also works with charitable organizations.

Jo Ann is married to Ron. They have a son who is married and has recently made them grandparents. The family enjoys spending time together and traveling.

9:00am–12:00pm • Spring Lake C
Breakout Session III
TCOLE Simplified

Lynn Beard, Richard Gutierrez & Derry Minor

The course will provide detailed information relating to the proper appointment of Jailers, Peace Officers and Telecommunicators, as well as current and archived credentialing file requirements.

Lynn Beard
Agent, Texas Commission on Law Enforcement

In his 26 plus years of law enforcement service time, Agent Lynn Beard has performed a wide array of duties, ranging from street patrol and community policing program organizer to lead instructor and BPOC coordinator. Lynn has taught courses such as, Crisis Intervention Training, Emergency Vehicle Operations, Defensive Tactics, Patrol Tactics, OC Spray, Mechanics of Arrest, Ethics, Professional Policing, as well as other mandated courses. You can reach Lynn by phone or email, 325-998-4433 or Lynn.beard@tcole.texas.gov.

Richard Gutierrez
Captain-Field Service Supervisory Agent, Texas Commission on Law Enforcement (TCOLE)

Captain Gutierrez has 42 years of continuous service as a commissioned peace officer with the state of Texas. After retiring from the Texas Department of Public Safety in 2007, he joined the Texas Commission on Law Enforcement, where he currently serves as Field Services Division Supervisor. During the past three decades, Captain Gutierrez has presented a wide variety of law enforcement officer safety and management courses at training academies and police departments statewide; but he readily admits his personal preference are topics which promote professional growth and development of commissioned, as well as non-commissioned personnel. Richard can be reached at richard.gutierrez@tcole.texas.gov.

Derry Minor
Lead FSA-Region #3, Texas Commission on Law Enforcement

Derry Minor has 37 years of law enforcement experience. He has worked on patrol and in investigations, which include narcotic and major organized crime related investigations. Derry has taught narcotics and investigation related training to students at law enforcement academies. Since being employed with TCOLE, Derry has instructed numerous TCOLE simplified courses, as well as Chief’s Continuing Education and Command Leadership courses for the Law Enforcement Management Institute of Texas. Derry can be reached at 361-290-8517, or derry.minor@tcole.texas.gov.

9:00am–12:00pm • San Marcos River A
Breakout Session IV
Leadership Motives

Ryan Braus

The Leadership Motives course is designed for those stepping into leadership roles, newly promoted leaders or those who have been in leadership roles for a long time. The material covered throughout this course will provide students with the tools to establish guardrails in their leadership journey to prevent them from abdicating some of their most important responsibilities. The course was created to give foundational information for any leader, at any stage in their leadership journey.

We will discuss the two leadership motives as well as the cultural impacts of a leader’s motives. An agency’s culture is one of the single most important areas of concern for any leader. Organizational health may trump any other area in agency leadership, and organizations never become healthy on accident.

The course material includes the five leadership areas most often avoided due to misplaced motives. We briefly cover team building, managing subordinates, having difficult conversations, meetings, and communicating consistently and repetitively.

The course covers being an example future leaders can follow as well as character traits of ideal team members. And the course closes with the importance of learning to lead oneself.

If we have a bad culture, it’s because we’ve tolerated it. If we want something different, we’re going to have to create something different now. Organizations never become healthy by accident.

Ryan Braus
Assistant Chief, Lubbock County Sheriff’s Office

Ryan Braus began his service with Lubbock County as a line officer, during that time he served on the transition team for the newly constructed Lubbock County Detention Center. He later promoted to the position of Corporal where he trained other line staff personnel. Braus then promoted to Sergeant, where he was engaged in the day-to-day operations of shift operations and took ownership of the training team on his shift. He later promoted to the position of Shift Lieutenant. While in this position, he facilitated a staffing analysis which contributed to the transition from 8-hour shifts to 12-hour shifts. Braus also researched and led a team to establish the “Step-Up Program,” which was designed to reduce the reliance of Solitary Confinement for chronic behaviorally challenged inmates. In 2016, he was promoted to the position of Captain and Director of Programs and Accreditation. In August of 2021, he was appointed to Assistant Chief Deputy for the Detention Center where he currently serves.

9:00am–12:00pm • San Marcos River B
Breakout Session V
Innovation Through Sustainability Initiatives in Corrections

Shelbi Davis & Steven Wentrcek

Recently, interest in reducing costs and environmental impacts has led to the implementation of sustainability programs at correctional institutions nationwide. These programs often focus on reducing energy, potable water, solid waste, and toxic materials and increasing the production and consumption of local food and other ecological programs. Sustainability-oriented programming aligns with the American Correctional Association's (ACA) 2011 policy statement. In this presentation, we will discuss steps towards corrections operate more sustainably with examples.

Shelbi Davis
Environmental Specialist at Transportation and National Resources, Travis County

Shelbi Davis graduated from the University of Texas with a Bachelor of Science in Health Promotion. She earned her Master of Public Health in Epidemiology at the UT Health Science Center, School of Public Health. Shelbi has also earned a certificate in Climate Change and Health from Yale University. She worked as a Public Health Strategist at Williamson County and Cities Health District (WCCHD) in Round Rock, Texas, where she coordinated grant management, quality improvement, strategic planning, and data management. While working at WCCHD, she was a part of Williamson County’s COVID-19 response and case investigation team. Shelbi currently works as a Sustainability Analyst and Coordinator for Travis County, where she leads data collection and reporting, oversees recycling contracts, and coordinates events and programs. Shelbi is working with staff from the Travis County Correctional Facility to promote sustainability initiatives and projects for jail staff and inmates.

In her free time, Shelbi loves to kayak, hike with her dog, practice yoga, and taste food from across the globe. In 2019, she became a certified scuba diver to explore the world’s water systems and learn more about ocean conservation and protection. She is originally from upstate New York but has lived in Austin most of her life and enjoys live music, breakfast tacos, and watching movies at Alamo Drafthouse.

Steven Wentrcek
Life Safety Manager, Travis County Sheriff’s Office

Steven Wentrcek started his career with the Travis County Sheriff’s Office (TCSO) fresh out of college in 1995. He graduated from Sam Houston State University with a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice, with a plan to go to patrol as soon as possible. 26 years later, everyone knows him as the “Life Safety Guy.” He never found his way to patrol, but instead has made the Travis County Sheriff’s Office’s Life Safety Section one of the best in the State.

His TCSO career started at the Travis County Jail, wherein 2003, he was awarded the Corrections Bureau Officer of the Year. Wentrcek served in several other sections, and then in 2004, he found his perfect job as a Life Safety Officer. Wentrcek continued to be recognized for his achievements in 2010 with another Corrections Officer of the Year. He is currently the Safety Division Manager and partly reasonable for 14 consecutive certificates of compliance from the Texas Commission on Jail Standards. In 2017, Wentrcek was “promoted” to oversee several other sections, including Marketable Skills, SWAP (Sheriffs Weekend Alternative Program), Gardens and Grounds, Construction, and Jail Projects. In 2020, Wentrcek was again honored by receiving TCSO Employee of the Year. He will tell you that his true calling is firefighting. Wentrcek is currently the Fire Chief for the Bartlett Vol. Fire Department. He has been volunteering for over 20 years, racking up thousands of hours serving his community. Wentrcek has assisted his fire department in writing grants with a grant total over $1,000,000.

He has a passion to give back to the community, including supporting sustainability iniatives. Wentrcek has teamed up with community partners to help spread the word about sustainability. They have started a project called “The Jail Sustainability Project,” with hope of starting a grass roots movement that will leave a better world for his children.

9:00am–12:00pm • Chautaqua Room
Breakout Session VI
Small Jail Issues - Panel Discussion

Mike Starkey, Thomas Kerss, Botie Hillhouse, Cassandra Shaw & Jason Jouett

A great percentage of jails located in Texas are in a rural setting. That includes some in a geographic setting close to a major metropolitan center. The resources available to those jails are, at times, nonexistent for the bevy of issues that they may encounter. During this class/discussion, we will attempt to help resolve those issues with guidance from the panel. In addition, and in the spirit of the Texas Jail Association, networking within the classroom will be highly encouraged.

Mike Starkey
TJA Past President, Henderson County Sheriff’s Office (retired)

Mike Starkey has been employed in corrections for approximately 46 years. He retired in 2002, from the Texas Department of Criminal Justice as an Assistant Warden. Mike was in private corrections from 2002-2003. He went to work as the Jail Administrator in Leon County in 2003. Mike was hired by the Henderson County Sheriff's Office in December 2008, as the Jail Captain. He retired from that position in 2018. Since his retirement, Mike has kept his TCOLE status as a Reserve Deputy and Basic Instructor. He currently assists Henderson County Sheriff's Office by instructing in the Jail Academy and duties as assigned by the Sheriff. He currently holds an active Master Jailers License, as well as his Peace Officers License. Mike is a graduate of Sam Houston State University with a B.S. in Criminology and Corrections. He is also currently employed by a vendor within the realm of jail supplies.

Thomas Kerss
Law Enforcement Team Supervisior, Texas Association of Counties (TAC)

Sheriff (Ret.) Thomas Kerss joined Texas Association of Counties (TAC) in 2013, after leaving office as sheriff of Nacogdoches County. He supervises TAC’s talented team of Law Enforcement Consultants and Simulator Trainers.

Thomas began his law enforcement career as a patrol officer with the Tyler Police Department in 1981, and now has over 40-years in the profession. Thomas is a graduate of the FBI National Academy (Session 181) in Quantico, Virginia, and holds a bachelor’s degree in law enforcement from Stephen F. Austin State University. He is a Certified Public Manager and holds a Master Peace Officer’s License, a Master Jailer’s License, and a Law Enforcement Instructor’s License through TCOLE. Thomas is a past president of the Sheriffs’ Association of Texas and sits on the National Sheriffs’ Legal Affairs Committee. He has received numerous accolades during his career, and loves serving the citizens, counties, and officials of Texas. Thomas can be reached at thomask@county.org or (512) 589-3922.

Botie Hillhouse
Sheriff, Henderson County Sheriff’s Office

Sheriff Botie Hillhouse graduated from Athens High School and has an Associate of Applied Science in Criminal Justice from Trinity Valley Community College. He went to work as a Detention Officer for the Henderson County Sheriff’s Office in June of 1998, and later went to the East Texas Police Academy and received his Peace Officers Certificate. Before being elected Sheriff, he worked in or supervised every division at the Sheriff’s Office. He served as Jail Administrator, K-9 Handler, Criminal Investigator, Narcotics Investigator, Patrol Sergeant, Patrol Lieutenant, Detention Lieutenant, Major, Chief Deputy, Tactical Team Member, Tactical Team Leader, and Tactical Team Commander. He holds a Master Peace Officer License and a Master Jailers License, with over 3650 hours of continuing education from TCOLE. He took office as the Henderson County Sheriff in June of 2016 and hopes to serve the citizens of Henderson County for many years to come. He has been blessed with a rewarding career, beautiful wife, four girls, and a grandson that he loves dearly.

Cassandra Shaw
Lieutenant/Jail Administrator, Rusk County Sheriff’s Office

Cassandra Shaw has been employed by the Rusk County Sheriff’s Office for 22 years. She began her career as a jailer and promoted to Sergeant in 2005. She was also named Jail Administrator in 2005. Prior to working for Rusk County, Shaw was employed by the Texas Department of Criminal Justice. She is involved in many community groups dealing with youth and mental health issues.

Jason Jouett
North Texas Inspector, Texas Commission on Jail Standards

Jason Jouett began his career as a correctional officer with the Texas Department of Criminal Justice at the Price Daniel Unit in 1992, until he joined the U.S. Navy in 1994. He spent eight years in the Navy, serving onboard Nuclear Ballistic Missile Submarines. Jouett discharged from the Navy and came back to Texas in 2002. He was hired and promoted to the rank of lieutenant at the Rolling Plains Regional Jail prior to going to work as a corrections/training officer at the Eden Detention Center in Eden, Texas (CCA). He left CCA in 2014, and accepted the position of Jail Administrator with the Runnels County Jail in Ballinger, Texas, where he served until joining the Commission on August 1, 2018. Jason holds a Jailers License, TCOLE Instructors License, TCOLE Firearms Instructors License, Chemical Agents and Less Lethal Munitions Instructors License, as well as, a PPCT Instructors License.

Wellpath Ad

10:15–10:45am • Veramendi
Join the Exhibitors for Giveaways

11:00am • Veramendi
Exhibitor Showroom Closes

12:00–1:30pm
Lunch (On Your Own)

1:45pm • Hotel Atrium
Sheriff's Photo

1:30–4:30pm • Spring Lake A
Breakout Session I
Texas Gangs

Devin Gonzales

This course focuses on entering the most vital information when creating a new record entry into the TXGANG database and learning how to navigate the TXGANG database. We will also review how to search a suspect and for a suspect within the database. TXGANG is a multi-jurisdictional database. TXGANG data is a repository to maintain gang information. The purpose of TXGANG is to collect, analyze, store, and share data with other law enforcement agencies to help save the lives of those in the field. TXGANG is a proactive solution for law enforcement officials where officers can keep intelligence current by identifying suspected gang members and entering the correct information into the system. It also serves the criminal justice system by assisting corrections officers with supervising gang members, improving investigations, and increasing prosecutions of gang members. It is a critical tool for networking information. Without sharing intelligence, this information would typically take weeks or months to retrieve the suspected gang or gang member’s criminal activity.

Devin Gonzales
Captain, Texas Department of Public Safety

Devin R. Gonzales has been employed with the Texas Department of Public Safety since 1999. Gonzales was assigned to the Texas Highway Patrol from March 2000 to October 2005. In October of 2005, Gonzales promoted to Sergeant in the Criminal Law Enforcement Division and assigned to the Narcotics Service in Laredo, Webb County, TX. In October of 2007, Gonzales transferred to the Criminal Law Enforcement Narcotics Service North Texas Region Garland Office. In 2010 Gonzales transferred to the newly established Texas Department of Public Safety Criminal Investigations Division (CID) as an Agent in the Garland Office Major Gang Squad. In February 2013, Gonzales was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant and was placed in a supervisory role over the North Texas Region (Garland) Criminal Investigations Division Drug Trafficking Organizations group. In February 2014, Gonzales was transferred to supervisor the Texas Department of Public Safety CID North Texas Region Major Gang Unit (Garland) as the Lieutenant. In December of 2016 Gonzales was promoted to the position of Captain over Criminal Investigations Division, North Texas Region, District D. Here, Captain Gonzales supervised three (3) CID Units which consists of (1) Drug Trafficking Group, one (1) Human Trafficking Group and the Task Force group. In September of 2019, Captain Gonzales was transferred to the Texas Anti-Gang Center and now supervisors the Garland and Hurst Major Gang Units (1E District) as the Captain. In addition Captain Gonzales has a Narcotics Unit in Garland and Denton. Gonzales holds a Master Peace Officer’s license through the Texas Commission On Law Enforcement. Gonzales has a history of investigating narcotics trafficking groups and gangs in the State of Texas. In the past several years, Captain Gonzales has served as an instructor and lecturer on gang history, identification, and confirmation through the TXGang database, presenting to different law enforcement agencies across the state, DFW metroplex, and Oklahoma. In addition, Captain Gonzales instructs new CID Agents on gang recognition, TXGang and criminal enterprise investigations. Captain Gonzales continues to interact routinely with prosecuting attorneys regarding gang intelligence and their request for assistance in gang-related cases.

Captain Gonzales continues to increase and enhance his knowledge of the evolution of criminal street and prison gangs by continuing to investigate gang cases alongside Major Gang Unit Special Agents; reviewing testimony, investigative reports, and documents of law enforcement agencies in gang-related cases throughout Texas; personally debriefing criminal gang defendants; attending contemporary gang training conferences and seminars.

1:30–4:30pm • Spring Lake B
Breakout Session II
Successful Courtroom Testimony

Jo Ann Linzer

The last thing a member of law enforcement wants to do is to testify in a courtroom, to feel like his or her work is being reviewed with a red pen, to justify his or her actions in a courtroom. However, courtroom testimony may be a consequence of the job whether you are a peace officer, probation officer, parole officer, corrections officer or support staff.

This course will assist participants in discovering keys to good report writing which may keep them out of a courtroom. It will also provide officers with information and tips for when it comes time to testify. Through the presentation and activities, participants will take away useful information for the next time they hit the witness stand. Knowing how to prepare, the trial process and the role that being a witness plays in a trial and hearing gives every witness a sense of confidence that will put them more at ease.

The course consists of a PowerPoint and discussion lasting one hour and has two activities. Topics covered include the trial process, pretrial hearings, courtroom demeanor, attorney/witness meetings, credibility, legal issues, direct and cross examination, and jury perception. The activities give the participants an opportunity to network and to role play as if they were in a courtroom setting.

Jo Ann Linzer
Attorney, Linzer and Gaines Attorneys at Law

Jo Ann Linzer has been teaching law enforcement, lawyers, and others who work with courts and law enforcement for over 15 years. She was awarded the Texas District and County Attorney’s Association (TDCAA) C. Chris Marshall Award in 2017, for “outstanding contributions in the education of Texas Prosecutors.” Jo Ann has been named one of the 10 Best Attorneys in Texas and is Board Certified in Criminal Law.

After college, Jo Ann had a career in the theme park industry. Her expertise was in training and development. In the corporate world, she taught front-line employees, leaders, and managers how to be more effective in their roles. She brought that love of training with her when she became a prosecutor and taught with TDCAA at law enforcement agencies and in district attorneys’ offices across the state. She is currently a guest lecturer at Baylor School of Law. She was a prosecutor for approximately 15 years in and now owns a criminal defense practice. She also works with charitable organizations.

Jo Ann is married to Ron. They have a son who is married and has recently made them grandparents. The family enjoys spending time together and traveling.

1:30–4:30pm • Spring Lake C
Breakout Session III
TCOLE Simplified

Lynn Beard, Richard Gutierrez & Derry Minor

The course will provide detailed information relating to the proper appointment of Jailers, Peace Officers and Telecommunicators, as well as current and archived credentialing file requirements.

Lynn Beard
Agent, Texas Commission on Law Enforcement

In his 26 plus years of law enforcement service time, Agent Lynn Beard has performed a wide array of duties, ranging from street patrol and community policing program organizer to lead instructor and BPOC coordinator. Lynn has taught courses such as, Crisis Intervention Training, Emergency Vehicle Operations, Defensive Tactics, Patrol Tactics, OC Spray, Mechanics of Arrest, Ethics, Professional Policing, as well as other mandated courses. You can reach Lynn by phone or email, 325-998-4433 or Lynn.beard@tcole.texas.gov.

Richard Gutierrez
Captain-Field Service Supervisory Agent, Texas Commission on Law Enforcement (TCOLE)

Captain Gutierrez has 42 years of continuous service as a commissioned peace officer with the state of Texas. After retiring from the Texas Department of Public Safety in 2007, he joined the Texas Commission on Law Enforcement, where he currently serves as Field Services Division Supervisor. During the past three decades, Captain Gutierrez has presented a wide variety of law enforcement officer safety and management courses at training academies and police departments statewide; but he readily admits his personal preference are topics which promote professional growth and development of commissioned, as well as non-commissioned personnel. Richard can be reached at richard.gutierrez@tcole.texas.gov.

Derry Minor
Lead FSA-Region #3, Texas Commission on Law Enforcement

Derry Minor has 37 years of law enforcement experience. He has worked on patrol and in investigations, which include narcotic and major organized crime related investigations. Derry has taught narcotics and investigation related training to students at law enforcement academies. Since being employed with TCOLE, Derry has instructed numerous TCOLE simplified courses, as well as Chief’s Continuing Education and Command Leadership courses for the Law Enforcement Management Institute of Texas. Derry can be reached at 361-290-8517, or derry.minor@tcole.texas.gov.

1:30–4:30pm • San Marcos River A
Breakout Session IV
Leadership Motives

Ryan Braus

The Leadership Motives course is designed for those stepping into leadership roles, newly promoted leaders or those who have been in leadership roles for a long time. The material covered throughout this course will provide students with the tools to establish guardrails in their leadership journey to prevent them from abdicating some of their most important responsibilities. The course was created to give foundational information for any leader, at any stage in their leadership journey.

We will discuss the two leadership motives as well as the cultural impacts of a leader’s motives. An agency’s culture is one of the single most important areas of concern for any leader. Organizational health may trump any other area in agency leadership, and organizations never become healthy on accident.

The course material includes the five leadership areas most often avoided due to misplaced motives. We briefly cover team building, managing subordinates, having difficult conversations, meetings, and communicating consistently and repetitively.

The course covers being an example future leaders can follow as well as character traits of ideal team members. And the course closes with the importance of learning to lead oneself.

If we have a bad culture, it’s because we’ve tolerated it. If we want something different, we’re going to have to create something different now. Organizations never become healthy by accident.

Ryan Braus
Assistant Chief, Lubbock County Sheriff’s Office

Ryan Braus began his service with Lubbock County as a line officer, during that time he served on the transition team for the newly constructed Lubbock County Detention Center. He later promoted to the position of Corporal where he trained other line staff personnel. Braus then promoted to Sergeant, where he was engaged in the day-to-day operations of shift operations and took ownership of the training team on his shift. He later promoted to the position of Shift Lieutenant. While in this position, he facilitated a staffing analysis which contributed to the transition from 8-hour shifts to 12-hour shifts. Braus also researched and led a team to establish the “Step-Up Program,” which was designed to reduce the reliance of Solitary Confinement for chronic behaviorally challenged inmates. In 2016, he was promoted to the position of Captain and Director of Programs and Accreditation. In August of 2021, he was appointed to Assistant Chief Deputy for the Detention Center where he currently serves.

1:30–4:30pm • San Marcos River B
Breakout Session V
Innovation Through Sustainability Initiatives in Corrections

Shelbi Davis & Steven Wentrcek

Recently, interest in reducing costs and environmental impacts has led to the implementation of sustainability programs at correctional institutions nationwide. These programs often focus on reducing energy, potable water, solid waste, and toxic materials and increasing the production and consumption of local food and other ecological programs. Sustainability-oriented programming aligns with the American Correctional Association's (ACA) 2011 policy statement. In this presentation, we will discuss steps towards corrections operate more sustainably with examples.

Shelbi Davis
Environmental Specialist at Transportation and National Resources, Travis County

Shelbi Davis graduated from the University of Texas with a Bachelor of Science in Health Promotion. She earned her Master of Public Health in Epidemiology at the UT Health Science Center, School of Public Health. Shelbi has also earned a certificate in Climate Change and Health from Yale University. She worked as a Public Health Strategist at Williamson County and Cities Health District (WCCHD) in Round Rock, Texas, where she coordinated grant management, quality improvement, strategic planning, and data management. While working at WCCHD, she was a part of Williamson County’s COVID-19 response and case investigation team. Shelbi currently works as a Sustainability Analyst and Coordinator for Travis County, where she leads data collection and reporting, oversees recycling contracts, and coordinates events and programs. Shelbi is working with staff from the Travis County Correctional Facility to promote sustainability initiatives and projects for jail staff and inmates.

In her free time, Shelbi loves to kayak, hike with her dog, practice yoga, and taste food from across the globe. In 2019, she became a certified scuba diver to explore the world’s water systems and learn more about ocean conservation and protection. She is originally from upstate New York but has lived in Austin most of her life and enjoys live music, breakfast tacos, and watching movies at Alamo Drafthouse.

Steven Wentrcek
Life Safety Manager, Travis County Sheriff’s Office

Steven Wentrcek started his career with the Travis County Sheriff’s Office (TCSO) fresh out of college in 1995. He graduated from Sam Houston State University with a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice, with a plan to go to patrol as soon as possible. 26 years later, everyone knows him as the “Life Safety Guy.” He never found his way to patrol, but instead has made the Travis County Sheriff’s Office’s Life Safety Section one of the best in the State.

His TCSO career started at the Travis County Jail, wherein 2003, he was awarded the Corrections Bureau Officer of the Year. Wentrcek served in several other sections, and then in 2004, he found his perfect job as a Life Safety Officer. Wentrcek continued to be recognized for his achievements in 2010 with another Corrections Officer of the Year. He is currently the Safety Division Manager and partly reasonable for 14 consecutive certificates of compliance from the Texas Commission on Jail Standards. In 2017, Wentrcek was “promoted” to oversee several other sections, including Marketable Skills, SWAP (Sheriffs Weekend Alternative Program), Gardens and Grounds, Construction, and Jail Projects. In 2020, Wentrcek was again honored by receiving TCSO Employee of the Year. He will tell you that his true calling is firefighting. Wentrcek is currently the Fire Chief for the Bartlett Vol. Fire Department. He has been volunteering for over 20 years, racking up thousands of hours serving his community. Wentrcek has assisted his fire department in writing grants with a grant total over $1,000,000.

He has a passion to give back to the community, including supporting sustainability iniatives. Wentrcek has teamed up with community partners to help spread the word about sustainability. They have started a project called “The Jail Sustainability Project,” with hope of starting a grass roots movement that will leave a better world for his children.

1:30–4:30pm • Chautaqua Room
Breakout Session VI
Small Jail Issues - Panel Discussion

Mike Starkey, Thomas Kerss, Botie Hillhouse, Cassandra Shaw & Jason Jouett

A great percentage of jails located in Texas are in a rural setting. That includes some in a geographic setting close to a major metropolitan center. The resources available to those jails are, at times, nonexistent for the bevy of issues that they may encounter. During this class/discussion, we will attempt to help resolve those issues with guidance from the panel. In addition, and in the spirit of the Texas Jail Association, networking within the classroom will be highly encouraged.

Mike Starkey
TJA Past President, Henderson County Sheriff’s Office (retired)

Mike Starkey has been employed in corrections for approximately 46 years. He retired in 2002, from the Texas Department of Criminal Justice as an Assistant Warden. Mike was in private corrections from 2002-2003. He went to work as the Jail Administrator in Leon County in 2003. Mike was hired by the Henderson County Sheriff's Office in December 2008, as the Jail Captain. He retired from that position in 2018. Since his retirement, Mike has kept his TCOLE status as a Reserve Deputy and Basic Instructor. He currently assists Henderson County Sheriff's Office by instructing in the Jail Academy and duties as assigned by the Sheriff. He currently holds an active Master Jailers License, as well as his Peace Officers License. Mike is a graduate of Sam Houston State University with a B.S. in Criminology and Corrections. He is also currently employed by a vendor within the realm of jail supplies.

Thomas Kerss
Law Enforcement Team Supervisior, Texas Association of Counties (TAC)

Sheriff (Ret.) Thomas Kerss joined Texas Association of Counties (TAC) in 2013, after leaving office as sheriff of Nacogdoches County. He supervises TAC’s talented team of Law Enforcement Consultants and Simulator Trainers.

Thomas began his law enforcement career as a patrol officer with the Tyler Police Department in 1981, and now has over 40-years in the profession. Thomas is a graduate of the FBI National Academy (Session 181) in Quantico, Virginia, and holds a bachelor’s degree in law enforcement from Stephen F. Austin State University. He is a Certified Public Manager and holds a Master Peace Officer’s License, a Master Jailer’s License, and a Law Enforcement Instructor’s License through TCOLE. Thomas is a past president of the Sheriffs’ Association of Texas and sits on the National Sheriffs’ Legal Affairs Committee. He has received numerous accolades during his career, and loves serving the citizens, counties, and officials of Texas. Thomas can be reached at thomask@county.org or (512) 589-3922.

Botie Hillhouse
Sheriff, Henderson County Sheriff’s Office

Sheriff Botie Hillhouse graduated from Athens High School and has an Associate of Applied Science in Criminal Justice from Trinity Valley Community College. He went to work as a Detention Officer for the Henderson County Sheriff’s Office in June of 1998, and later went to the East Texas Police Academy and received his Peace Officers Certificate. Before being elected Sheriff, he worked in or supervised every division at the Sheriff’s Office. He served as Jail Administrator, K-9 Handler, Criminal Investigator, Narcotics Investigator, Patrol Sergeant, Patrol Lieutenant, Detention Lieutenant, Major, Chief Deputy, Tactical Team Member, Tactical Team Leader, and Tactical Team Commander. He holds a Master Peace Officer License and a Master Jailers License, with over 3650 hours of continuing education from TCOLE. He took office as the Henderson County Sheriff in June of 2016 and hopes to serve the citizens of Henderson County for many years to come. He has been blessed with a rewarding career, beautiful wife, four girls, and a grandson that he loves dearly.

Cassandra Shaw
Lieutenant/Jail Administrator, Rusk County Sheriff’s Office

Cassandra Shaw has been employed by the Rusk County Sheriff’s Office for 22 years. She began her career as a jailer and promoted to Sergeant in 2005. She was also named Jail Administrator in 2005. Prior to working for Rusk County, Shaw was employed by the Texas Department of Criminal Justice. She is involved in many community groups dealing with youth and mental health issues.

Jason Jouett
North Texas Inspector, Texas Commission on Jail Standards

Jason Jouett began his career as a correctional officer with the Texas Department of Criminal Justice at the Price Daniel Unit in 1992, until he joined the U.S. Navy in 1994. He spent eight years in the Navy, serving onboard Nuclear Ballistic Missile Submarines. Jouett discharged from the Navy and came back to Texas in 2002. He was hired and promoted to the rank of lieutenant at the Rolling Plains Regional Jail prior to going to work as a corrections/training officer at the Eden Detention Center in Eden, Texas (CCA). He left CCA in 2014, and accepted the position of Jail Administrator with the Runnels County Jail in Ballinger, Texas, where he served until joining the Commission on August 1, 2018. Jason holds a Jailers License, TCOLE Instructors License, TCOLE Firearms Instructors License, Chemical Agents and Less Lethal Munitions Instructors License, as well as, a PPCT Instructors License.

Turnkey Health Ad

2:00pm • TBD
Sheriffs' Association of Texas Legislative Meeting

7:00–11:00pm • Hotel Foyer
Cornhole Night

Genesis eBonds Ad

Thursday, May 5

7:00–8:00am • Veramendi Ballroom C&D
Prayer Breakfast
Sheriff Lane Akin

Lane Akin
Sheriff, Wise County

Sheriff Lane Akin served more than 31 years as a law enforcement officer prior to becoming the Wise County Sheriff. He has served the citizens of Wise County for eight years. He began his career at D/FW Airport with their Department of Public Safety (DPS) when the airport opened in 1974. Two years later, Lane joined the Texas Department of Public Safety. He served as a Highway Patrol Trooper, a Narcotics Agent, Texas Ranger and a Texas Ranger supervisor. Lane was a member of the first DPS Special Weapons and Tactics (SWAT) team for Region 1. Just prior to retirement from DPS, he was the supervising Texas Ranger Lieutenant for Company “B,” the northeastern corner of Texas. In 2009 and 2010, he was the Enforcement Captain for Wise County Sheriff’s Office.

A native of Texas, Sheriff Akin earned a Bachelor of Science Degree in Criminal Justice from Texas A&M Commerce. He and his wife Kay moved to Decatur in 1992 where Lane served as the Texas Ranger for Wise, Jack, and Montague Counties. He was twice named Law Enforcement Officer of the Year by the Wise, Jack, and Montague County Criminal Justice Association. Sheriff Akin’s heart for service and dedication to law enforcement is a testament to his character.

HomeWAV Ad

8:15am • Hotel Atrium
Jail Administrator's Photo

9:00am–12:00pm • Spring Lake A
Breakout Session I
Disturbing Trends in Drugs and Alcohol Abuse

Tamara Spencer

The mission of the FRIDAY (Focus on Reducing Impaired Driving Among Youth) and ADAPT (Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention Training) programs is to empower local leaders such as law enforcement, jail personnel, school personnel and community coalitions by providing them with the knowledge needed to help reduce impaired driving and substance use in Texas.

FRIDAY & ADAPT are statewide training programs for law enforcement officers funded through a grant received from the Texas Department of Transportation (TXDOT). Our programs are taught by experienced Law Enforcement personnel who are considered experts in the fields of Drugs and Alcohol. We keep our curriculum as current as possible to keep up with the ever-growing trends of substance use/abuse. The classes are very interactive and engaging and we make sure to point out the trends we present are not just youth but ALL ages. Students will learn alcohol and drug ingestion methods, concealment methods, clothing trends and ‘lingo’ indicating references to substance use.

Tamara Spencer
Instructor, Focus on Reducing Impaired Driving Among Youth

Tamara Spencer dedicated 18 ½ years of her life to serving and protecting League City citizens. A native of Rochester, New York, Spencer relocated to the Houston area in 1975, graduating from J. Frank Dobie High School, and attended San Jacinto College.

She got her start in law enforcement in 1997, as a League City Patrol Officer. After 10 years on the League City Police force, Spencer was promoted to Sergeant, and quickly stepped in to serve as a Special Operations Sergeant. She left the department in 2016, as a day shift supervisor. Spencer was the second female sworn officer in the history of the department to have ever been promoted.

Spencer, a Master Peace Officer, has a long list of accomplishments and certifications including being certified and trained as a Standardized Field Sobriety test practitioner and instructor, State of Texas expert witness for DWI cases, mental health officer, bicycle and marine patrol officer, TCOLE certified instructor, Collision Avoidance Training instructor, Intoxilyzer Operator, Commander of the League City Honor Guard, advanced Accident Investigator, and a Crash Reconstruction Expert.

She is also certified to teach Critical Incident Peer Support and Suicide Prevention for Law Enforcement and has done so since 2009, with over 40 classes taught around the United States. Spencer actively assisted in teaching and coordinating events for the League City Citizens Police Academy Alumni Association. She has numerous awards, including the 100 Club of Houston Officer of the Year and the League City Police Department Medal of Valor. She was most proud of being honored during her career as a special delegate to China for her involvement in organizing as exchange internship program for students at China’s Zhejiang Police College with Sam Houston State University and the League City Police Department.

After leaving League City Police Department, Spencer joined the Texas Municipal Police Association in 2016, as a field representative for the Houston and East Texas Region. Her duties included assisting officers during critical incidents such as officer involved shootings, fatal crashes, and mental health support to include suicide interventions. Spencer also instructed numerous law enforcement classes around the state.

She is now the full-time Staff Instructor for the FRIDAY (Focus on Reducing Impaired Driving Among Youth) and ADAPT (Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention Training) Programs. Spencer continues to teach Critical Incident and Suicide Prevention courses as well. Her commission is currently being held by the Galveston County Pct 2 Constable’s Office. Spencer was recently appointed to the Board of Directors of BACODA-Bay Area Council on Drugs and Alcohol and is now the Vice Chairperson of the organization. She is married with four children and two granddaughters. Her husband James is a retired Assistant Chief of Police in League City.

9:00am–12:00pm • Spring Lake B
Breakout Session II
Raising the Bar

Lynn Beard, Richard Gutierrez & Derry Minor

This session will identify the basic educational prerequisites for appointment as a County Corrections Officer in Texas. It will also provide a list of the minimum continuing education course mandates and all proficiency certification course requirements.

In addition, the course will help participants understand the breath and scope of the Abbreviated County Jailer Course. The student will understand the concept/limitation of a minimum standard and realize the dire need for training beyond the bare minimum standards set by state government. The attendee will comprehend the measurable returns or benefits of continuous staff professionalization. Also, the class will be able to locate basic information and resources on the TCOLE website.

Lynn Beard
Agent, Texas Commission on Law Enforcement

In his 26 plus years of law enforcement service time, Agent Lynn Beard has performed a wide array of duties, ranging from street patrol and community policing program organizer to lead instructor and BPOC coordinator. Lynn has taught courses such as, Crisis Intervention Training, Emergency Vehicle Operations, Defensive Tactics, Patrol Tactics, OC Spray, Mechanics of Arrest, Ethics, Professional Policing, as well as other mandated courses. You can reach Lynn by phone or email, 325-998-4433 or Lynn.beard@tcole.texas.gov.

Richard Gutierrez
Captain-Field Service Supervisory Agent, Texas Commission on Law Enforcement (TCOLE)

Captain Gutierrez has 42 years of continuous service as a commissioned peace officer with the state of Texas. After retiring from the Texas Department of Public Safety in 2007, he joined the Texas Commission on Law Enforcement, where he currently serves as Field Services Division Supervisor. During the past three decades, Captain Gutierrez has presented a wide variety of law enforcement officer safety and management courses at training academies and police departments statewide; but he readily admits his personal preference are topics which promote professional growth and development of commissioned, as well as non-commissioned personnel. Richard can be reached at richard.gutierrez@tcole.texas.gov.

Derry Minor
Lead FSA-Region #3, Texas Commission on Law Enforcement

Derry Minor has 37 years of law enforcement experience. He has worked on patrol and in investigations, which include narcotic and major organized crime related investigations. Derry has taught narcotics and investigation related training to students at law enforcement academies. Since being employed with TCOLE, Derry has instructed numerous TCOLE simplified courses, as well as Chief’s Continuing Education and Command Leadership courses for the Law Enforcement Management Institute of Texas. Derry can be reached at 361-290-8517, or derry.minor@tcole.texas.gov.

9:00am–12:00pm • Spring Lake C
Breakout Session III
Easing the Pain of "No" — What Do You Say (When You Can't Say 'Yes'?)

Mark Warren

No one likes to hear the word “no”. And few people like to have to deliver it. Yet often, those responsible for redirecting the behavior of people under normal to extreme influences must first be in control of themselves when they have to say “no”, or when they can’t say “yes”. This presentation will reintroduce participants to the strategies and mechanisms of active, responsive “adulting” (including words, language and postures), interpersonal communication, cooperation and relationship – building and positive conflict behaviors through a series of skill exercises. It’s true that in serving the public, one can’t often give people what they want, but by understanding the difference between redirection and punishment, participants can more easily help them get what they need.

Mark Warren
Training Consultant, Texas Association of Counties (TAC)

Mark Warren is a Training Consultant with the Texas Association of Counties (TAC) in his hometown of Austin, Texas. Mark retired as a full-time employee on July 31, 2015, and came back as a contract trainer for TAC on September 1, 2015. His presentations convey a message of inspiration, motivation, and new direction and revolve around leadership, interpersonal communication, relationship skills, workplace diversity and professionalism, bridging the generations and customer service excellence. Mark worked with the TAC Leadership Program and served as the coordinator of its leadership training from 2002, and County Best Practices from 2009 to 2015.

After graduating from St. Edward’s University in 1977, Mark spent 23 years with the Texas Department of Public Safety, retiring in 2000, as the Assistant Commander of the Training Academy in Austin. In December 2015, Mark began a series of presentations on verbal de-escalation with of the Texas Police Association for the Department of Public Safety and law enforcement and criminal justice professionals across Texas. For more information on Mark’s presentations, please visit, www.county.org/Education-Training/Event-Presentations/Special-Presentations, or mwarren24@msn.com.

9:00am–12:00pm • San Marcos River A
Breakout Session IV
Response to Resistance: Excessive Use of Force and Bystander Liability in a Jail Setting

Darren Jackson

Verbal communication has become secondary in our current culture. This session presents alternate responses to situations that detention officers encounter during verbal interactions with inmates. These responses are utilized and practiced during this session.

Darren Jackson
Senior Law Enforcement Consultant, Texas Association of Counties (TAC)

Darren Jackson began his law enforcement career in 1984, as a dispatcher. He worked with Scurry County as a correctional officer and deputy sheriff and was elected Sheriff in 1996, retiring in 2012. After his retirement, Darren worked as a deputy constable for Williamson County.

Darren joined TAC in 2014, as a law enforcement consultant. He later became the Simulator Program Supervisor. Darren is responsible for the Driving Simulator, Law Enforcement Simulator, and the operation of the Resistance Response Simulator (RRS). He oversees equipment operation, maintenance, training instruction, and scheduling. Darren develops the training materials and assists TAC RMP members with fleet safety and use of force issues by proposing best practices to reduce liability for driving related accidents and use of force cases. He holds degrees from Western Texas College and Midwestern State University.

9:00am–12:00pm • San Marcos River B
Breakout Session V
Informal Leadership

Shelley Knight

A leader is usually perceived as the person in charge. A true leader can be anyone. A leader is a person who can convince others to follow. A great leader is able to inspire others and moves them to action. Every person can be a leader regardless of the title or position that they hold. This class will discuss the different aspects of what makes a leader and the impact that informal leaders have on an organization. We will also discuss how the informal leaders can be utilized to make your organization the best it can be.

Shelley Knight
Captain, Dallas County Sheriff’s Office

Shelley Knight started the Dallas County Sheriff’s Office as a Detention Service Officer on August 5, 1991. She became a Deputy Sheriff in September 1995. As a deputy, Shelley worked in Detentions, Warrant Execution, and Traffic. She promoted to Senior Sergeant in 2006 where she was assigned to Detentions, Patrol, and then Strategic Planning and Research. As a Sergeant, Shelley went back to school and started her journey to earn a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice administration from the University of Phoenix. She earned her degree in May 2010. Shelley then promoted to Lieutenant in November 2009 and was assigned to Communications and Release. She earned her master’s degree in Leadership and Management in Criminal Justice from Sam Houston State University in August 2012. Shelley promoted to Captain in November 2012 and have led the following areas: Detentions, Judicial Services, Special Investigations, Clean Air Task Force, Personnel/Training and Communication. She graduated from the Leadership Command College Class 74 in 2015 and the FBI National Academy Class 262 in December 2015. Shelley holds a Master Peace Officer license and a Master Jailer license. She is also a TCOLE Instructor. Shelley lives in Caddo Mills, Texas with her wife of 21 years and their 19-year-old son.

9:00am–12:00pm • Chautaqua Room
Breakout Session VI
How to Prepare for Promotional Boards

Jennifer Segura & Frances Dembowski

Prepare and improve your skills/techniques for internal interviews for promotional boards or a different assignment. Examine sample board/interview questions, sample written assignments, discuss how to address. Review preparation tips for the process from start to finish; attain additional strategies to enhance your chances of success.

Jennifer Segura
Lieutenant, Travis County Sheriff’s Office

Lieutenant Jennifer Segura has been with the Travis County Sheriff’s Office for 26 years. She is dual licensed as a Master Jailer and Master Peace Officer. She has worked a variety of assignments in varying capacities, which include Personnel, various housing facilities, Transportation, and the Hospital Visitation unit. She has worked as both an Officer and in a Supervisory capacity in several of her assignments.

Jennifer received a bachelor's degree in Criminal Justice, graduate of several leadership schools to include FBI-LEEDA, Austin Police Department Leadership Academy, National Jail Leadership Command Academy Class #41 and holds an instructor license.

Frances Dembowski
Lieutenant, Travis County Sheriff’s Office

Frances Dembowski has been employed with the Travis County Sheriff’s Office for over 21 years. She currently holds the rank of Lieutenant. She is dual certified and has obtained her Master Jailer and Master Peace Officer Licenses. Frances has experience working numerous assignments within the jail and Courthouse Security. Frances is a graduate of the Department of Public Safety’s Fitness Institute and the National Jail Leadership Command Academy, Class #31. In addition to various professional development training, Frances has an associate degree in Criminal Justice. Frances has served as a Texas Jail Association board member for the last six years and is currently serving as Director on various committees.

RA-Lock Security Solutions Ad

12:00–1:30pm
Lunch (On Your Own)

1:30–4:30pm • Spring Lake A
Breakout Session I
Disturbing Trends in Drugs and Alcohol Abuse

Tamara Spencer

The mission of the FRIDAY (Focus on Reducing Impaired Driving Among Youth) and ADAPT (Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention Training) programs is to empower local leaders such as law enforcement, jail personnel, school personnel and community coalitions by providing them with the knowledge needed to help reduce impaired driving and substance use in Texas.

FRIDAY & ADAPT are statewide training programs for law enforcement officers funded through a grant received from the Texas Department of Transportation (TXDOT). Our programs are taught by experienced Law Enforcement personnel who are considered experts in the fields of Drugs and Alcohol. We keep our curriculum as current as possible to keep up with the ever-growing trends of substance use/abuse. The classes are very interactive and engaging and we make sure to point out the trends we present are not just youth but ALL ages. Students will learn alcohol and drug ingestion methods, concealment methods, clothing trends and ‘lingo’ indicating references to substance use.

Tamara Spencer
Instructor, Focus on Reducing Impaired Driving Among Youth

Tamara Spencer dedicated 18 ½ years of her life to serving and protecting League City citizens. A native of Rochester, New York, Spencer relocated to the Houston area in 1975, graduating from J. Frank Dobie High School, and attended San Jacinto College.

She got her start in law enforcement in 1997, as a League City Patrol Officer. After 10 years on the League City Police force, Spencer was promoted to Sergeant, and quickly stepped in to serve as a Special Operations Sergeant. She left the department in 2016, as a day shift supervisor. Spencer was the second female sworn officer in the history of the department to have ever been promoted.

Spencer, a Master Peace Officer, has a long list of accomplishments and certifications including being certified and trained as a Standardized Field Sobriety test practitioner and instructor, State of Texas expert witness for DWI cases, mental health officer, bicycle and marine patrol officer, TCOLE certified instructor, Collision Avoidance Training instructor, Intoxilyzer Operator, Commander of the League City Honor Guard, advanced Accident Investigator, and a Crash Reconstruction Expert.

She is also certified to teach Critical Incident Peer Support and Suicide Prevention for Law Enforcement and has done so since 2009, with over 40 classes taught around the United States. Spencer actively assisted in teaching and coordinating events for the League City Citizens Police Academy Alumni Association. She has numerous awards, including the 100 Club of Houston Officer of the Year and the League City Police Department Medal of Valor. She was most proud of being honored during her career as a special delegate to China for her involvement in organizing as exchange internship program for students at China’s Zhejiang Police College with Sam Houston State University and the League City Police Department.

After leaving League City Police Department, Spencer joined the Texas Municipal Police Association in 2016, as a field representative for the Houston and East Texas Region. Her duties included assisting officers during critical incidents such as officer involved shootings, fatal crashes, and mental health support to include suicide interventions. Spencer also instructed numerous law enforcement classes around the state.

She is now the full-time Staff Instructor for the FRIDAY (Focus on Reducing Impaired Driving Among Youth) and ADAPT (Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention Training) Programs. Spencer continues to teach Critical Incident and Suicide Prevention courses as well. Her commission is currently being held by the Galveston County Pct 2 Constable’s Office. Spencer was recently appointed to the Board of Directors of BACODA-Bay Area Council on Drugs and Alcohol and is now the Vice Chairperson of the organization. She is married with four children and two granddaughters. Her husband James is a retired Assistant Chief of Police in League City.

1:30–4:30pm • Spring Lake B
Breakout Session II
Raising the Bar

Lynn Beard, Richard Gutierrez & Derry Minor

This session will identify the basic educational prerequisites for appointment as a County Corrections Officer in Texas. It will also provide a list of the minimum continuing education course mandates and all proficiency certification course requirements.

In addition, the course will help participants understand the breath and scope of the Abbreviated County Jailer Course. The student will understand the concept/limitation of a minimum standard and realize the dire need for training beyond the bare minimum standards set by state government. The attendee will comprehend the measurable returns or benefits of continuous staff professionalization. Also, the class will be able to locate basic information and resources on the TCOLE website.

Lynn Beard
Agent, Texas Commission on Law Enforcement

In his 26 plus years of law enforcement service time, Agent Lynn Beard has performed a wide array of duties, ranging from street patrol and community policing program organizer to lead instructor and BPOC coordinator. Lynn has taught courses such as, Crisis Intervention Training, Emergency Vehicle Operations, Defensive Tactics, Patrol Tactics, OC Spray, Mechanics of Arrest, Ethics, Professional Policing, as well as other mandated courses. You can reach Lynn by phone or email, 325-998-4433 or Lynn.beard@tcole.texas.gov.

Richard Gutierrez
Captain-Field Service Supervisory Agent, Texas Commission on Law Enforcement (TCOLE)

Captain Gutierrez has 42 years of continuous service as a commissioned peace officer with the state of Texas. After retiring from the Texas Department of Public Safety in 2007, he joined the Texas Commission on Law Enforcement, where he currently serves as Field Services Division Supervisor. During the past three decades, Captain Gutierrez has presented a wide variety of law enforcement officer safety and management courses at training academies and police departments statewide; but he readily admits his personal preference are topics which promote professional growth and development of commissioned, as well as non-commissioned personnel. Richard can be reached at richard.gutierrez@tcole.texas.gov.

Derry Minor
Lead FSA-Region #3, Texas Commission on Law Enforcement

Derry Minor has 37 years of law enforcement experience. He has worked on patrol and in investigations, which include narcotic and major organized crime related investigations. Derry has taught narcotics and investigation related training to students at law enforcement academies. Since being employed with TCOLE, Derry has instructed numerous TCOLE simplified courses, as well as Chief’s Continuing Education and Command Leadership courses for the Law Enforcement Management Institute of Texas. Derry can be reached at 361-290-8517, or derry.minor@tcole.texas.gov.

1:30–4:30pm • Spring Lake C
Breakout Session III
Easing the Pain of "No" — What Do You Say (When You Can't Say 'Yes'?)

Mark Warren

No one likes to hear the word “no”. And few people like to have to deliver it. Yet often, those responsible for redirecting the behavior of people under normal to extreme influences must first be in control of themselves when they have to say “no”, or when they can’t say “yes”. This presentation will reintroduce participants to the strategies and mechanisms of active, responsive “adulting” (including words, language and postures), interpersonal communication, cooperation and relationship – building and positive conflict behaviors through a series of skill exercises. It’s true that in serving the public, one can’t often give people what they want, but by understanding the difference between redirection and punishment, participants can more easily help them get what they need.

Mark Warren
Training Consultant, Texas Association of Counties (TAC)

Mark Warren is a Training Consultant with the Texas Association of Counties (TAC) in his hometown of Austin, Texas. Mark retired as a full-time employee on July 31, 2015, and came back as a contract trainer for TAC on September 1, 2015. His presentations convey a message of inspiration, motivation, and new direction and revolve around leadership, interpersonal communication, relationship skills, workplace diversity and professionalism, bridging the generations and customer service excellence. Mark worked with the TAC Leadership Program and served as the coordinator of its leadership training from 2002, and County Best Practices from 2009 to 2015.

After graduating from St. Edward’s University in 1977, Mark spent 23 years with the Texas Department of Public Safety, retiring in 2000, as the Assistant Commander of the Training Academy in Austin. In December 2015, Mark began a series of presentations on verbal de-escalation with of the Texas Police Association for the Department of Public Safety and law enforcement and criminal justice professionals across Texas. For more information on Mark’s presentations, please visit, www.county.org/Education-Training/Event-Presentations/Special-Presentations, or mwarren24@msn.com.

1:30–4:30pm • San Marcos River A
Breakout Session IV
Response to Resistance: Excessive Use of Force and Bystander Liability in a Jail Setting

Darren Jackson

Verbal communication has become secondary in our current culture. This session presents alternate responses to situations that detention officers encounter during verbal interactions with inmates. These responses are utilized and practiced during this session.

Darren Jackson
Senior Law Enforcement Consultant, Texas Association of Counties (TAC)

Darren Jackson began his law enforcement career in 1984, as a dispatcher. He worked with Scurry County as a correctional officer and deputy sheriff and was elected Sheriff in 1996, retiring in 2012. After his retirement, Darren worked as a deputy constable for Williamson County.

Darren joined TAC in 2014, as a law enforcement consultant. He later became the Simulator Program Supervisor. Darren is responsible for the Driving Simulator, Law Enforcement Simulator, and the operation of the Resistance Response Simulator (RRS). He oversees equipment operation, maintenance, training instruction, and scheduling. Darren develops the training materials and assists TAC RMP members with fleet safety and use of force issues by proposing best practices to reduce liability for driving related accidents and use of force cases. He holds degrees from Western Texas College and Midwestern State University.

1:30–4:30pm • San Marcos River B
Breakout Session V
Informal Leadership

Shelley Knight

A leader is usually perceived as the person in charge. A true leader can be anyone. A leader is a person who can convince others to follow. A great leader is able to inspire others and moves them to action. Every person can be a leader regardless of the title or position that they hold. This class will discuss the different aspects of what makes a leader and the impact that informal leaders have on an organization. We will also discuss how the informal leaders can be utilized to make your organization the best it can be.

Shelley Knight
Captain, Dallas County Sheriff’s Office

Shelley Knight started the Dallas County Sheriff’s Office as a Detention Service Officer on August 5, 1991. She became a Deputy Sheriff in September 1995. As a deputy, Shelley worked in Detentions, Warrant Execution, and Traffic. She promoted to Senior Sergeant in 2006 where she was assigned to Detentions, Patrol, and then Strategic Planning and Research. As a Sergeant, Shelley went back to school and started her journey to earn a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice administration from the University of Phoenix. She earned her degree in May 2010. Shelley then promoted to Lieutenant in November 2009 and was assigned to Communications and Release. She earned her master’s degree in Leadership and Management in Criminal Justice from Sam Houston State University in August 2012. Shelley promoted to Captain in November 2012 and have led the following areas: Detentions, Judicial Services, Special Investigations, Clean Air Task Force, Personnel/Training and Communication. She graduated from the Leadership Command College Class 74 in 2015 and the FBI National Academy Class 262 in December 2015. Shelley holds a Master Peace Officer license and a Master Jailer license. She is also a TCOLE Instructor. Shelley lives in Caddo Mills, Texas with her wife of 21 years and their 19-year-old son.

1:30–4:30pm • Chautaqua Room
Breakout Session VI
How to Prepare for Promotional Boards

Jennifer Segura & Frances Dembowski

Prepare and improve your skills/techniques for internal interviews for promotional boards or a different assignment. Examine sample board/interview questions, sample written assignments, discuss how to address. Review preparation tips for the process from start to finish; attain additional strategies to enhance your chances of success.

Jennifer Segura
Lieutenant, Travis County Sheriff’s Office

Lieutenant Jennifer Segura has been with the Travis County Sheriff’s Office for 26 years. She is dual licensed as a Master Jailer and Master Peace Officer. She has worked a variety of assignments in varying capacities, which include Personnel, various housing facilities, Transportation, and the Hospital Visitation unit. She has worked as both an Officer and in a Supervisory capacity in several of her assignments.

Jennifer received a bachelor's degree in Criminal Justice, graduate of several leadership schools to include FBI-LEEDA, Austin Police Department Leadership Academy, National Jail Leadership Command Academy Class #41 and holds an instructor license.

Frances Dembowski
Lieutenant, Travis County Sheriff’s Office

Frances Dembowski has been employed with the Travis County Sheriff’s Office for over 21 years. She currently holds the rank of Lieutenant. She is dual certified and has obtained her Master Jailer and Master Peace Officer Licenses. Frances has experience working numerous assignments within the jail and Courthouse Security. Frances is a graduate of the Department of Public Safety’s Fitness Institute and the National Jail Leadership Command Academy, Class #31. In addition to various professional development training, Frances has an associate degree in Criminal Justice. Frances has served as a Texas Jail Association board member for the last six years and is currently serving as Director on various committees.

Tyler Technologies Ad

7:00–9:00pm • Veramendi Ballroom
TJA Business Meeting & Awards Banquet

9:00pm–Midnight • Spring Lake
Band & Cornhole Night
Cody Widner Band

Friday, May 6

8:30–11:30am • Spring Lake Ballroom
CLOSING SESSION
Gulf Cartel

Ray DelBosque, Jr.

The Mexican Drug War is summarized as an ongoing low intensity asymmetric war between the Mexican Government and various drug trafficking DTO’S (Drug Trafficking Organizations). Del Bosque has compiled the best available data at present on crime and violence in Mexico, particularly as it relates to organized crime. This is a topic of both enormous complexity and also urgent concern, not only to Mexican government officials and citizens but also to those in the United States. The violence in the US-Mexico border is largely attributable to Mexico’s drug trafficking and organized crime. A large part of the sudden increase in violence along the border is attributable to drug trafficking and organized crime groups who are responsible for at least a third and as many as half of all intentional homicides which bare characteristics typical of organized-crime related killings, including the use of high-caliber automatic weapons, torture, dismemberment, and explicit messages involving organized-crime groups. The Mexican’s government's principal goal has been to put down the drug-related violence, claiming that their primary focus is on dismantling the powerful drug cartels, rather than preventing drug trafficking, which is left to U.S. functionaries.

Ray DelBosque, Jr.
Sheriff, Zapata County Sheriff’s Office

In 2012, Raymundo Del Bosque, Jr., was appointed by the Zapata County Sheriff, Alonso M. Lopez, as Chief Deputy of the Zapata County Sheriff’s Office for his vision to protect and serve the community and citizens while abiding to the Oath as a Texas Peace Officer and enforcing the Law. As Chief Deputy he was responsible for functions of Administrative and Field Operations, supervising the Investigation Division, Patrol Division, and Detention Facilities; often found in charge of the Sheriff’s Office in the absence of the Sheriff of Zapata County.

Born and raised in Zapata, Texas, a small farming and ranching community, Del Bosque attended the local schools where his parents once attended, and his mother continues to teach first grade. He attended Zapata High School, where he was introduced to cultural diversity and gained much appreciation for other languages and cultures, before graduating in 1996. In 1999, Del Bosque obtained his Basic Peace Officer Proficiency Certificate from the South Texas Border Regional Academy in Laredo, Texas.

After graduating from the South Texas Border Regional Academy, Del Bosque began working for the Zapata County Sheriff’s Office. He served in Patrol and was Sergeant Investigator of the Narcotics Division. During this time, he developed undercover skills, which lead him to begin work with the Laredo Multi-Agency Narcotics Taskforce, as Supervisor for the Laredo Violent Crime Unit, while continuing his higher education at Texas A&M International University and Laredo Community College.

In 2009, Del Bosque began working for the 49th Judicial District Attorney’s Office as the Webb/ Zapata County Criminal Investigator. In 2012, he returned to his hometown determined to positively impact his community by carrying out and putting into practice all his latent qualities and abilities. In 2020, Del Bosque was elected as the Zapata County Sheriff. He continues to develop strategies that lead to future success in his continuous fight against crime, narcotics, and human trafficking. Committed to his family, Sheriff Raymundo Del Bosque, Jr., is a proud parent of five.

9:00–11:00am • Chautaqua
Board Meeting

OSS Academy Ad

Presidential Sponsors

Disclaimer

All participants, exhibitors and speakers should be aware that the Texas Jail Association is a non-political organization. Please respect that during your participation in events.